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Expecting to enjoy the delicious treats that former President Ronald Reagan loved so much, a woman has filed a lawsuit against the Jelly Belly company after she accidentally consumed the company’s Sport Beans product.

Sport Beans are an exercise supplement produced by Jelly Belly, advertised as containing “electrolytes and vitamins.” But California resident Jessica Gomez says she was deceived about the sugar content of the product, with it containing more sugar than she was expecting.

The response from Jelly Belly?  They called the lawsuit “nonsense.”

Gomez’s lawsuit claims that the product contains “evaporated cane juice,” which Gomez contends is nothing more than a substitute term for sugar used to deceive well-meaning health nuts who still want to eat their Jelly Beans.

But, Jelly Belly contends that Gomez couldn’t have possibly read the “evaporated cane juice” on the ingredient list without also observing the nutritional information that discloses total sugar content. 

Gomez’s suit alleges “negligent misrepresentation and violations of California’s Consumer Legal Remedies Act, False Advertising Law and Unfair Business Practices Law. She is seeking a trial by jury, damages, restitution, attorneys’ fees and injunctive relief.”

6 comments

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  • Since 1963, I have noticed that almost all cockamamie stories are datelined either England or California.

    CALIFORNIA — THE GRANOLA STATE: rich in fruits, nuts, and flakes!

  • kinda have to agree with this one. why did the company use the term ‘evaporated cane juice’ instead of ‘sugar’? I would believe there was intent to deceive by using a longer three worded description of a substance that is commonly known by a 5 letter word.

  • She should not win her case if you find out there is more sugar in the product don’t eat it again and maybe should read label before eating it

  • There needs to be penalties for lawyers who file these claims for taking up the court’s time. A lawyer will file anything because on the off-chance that they win, they get 33%.