Winner of 16 Digital Marketing Awards Since 2010

Blog

  • Survey: Florida’s Lawsuit Climate Again Ranks Among Nation’s Worst

    Florida is ranked #46 in the 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States survey, falling two spots from its already low 2015 ranking. Florida scores poorly in all of the key element categories, but particularly with regard to the competence and impartiality of trial judges—where it ranked 48th. Watch the video above to learn more.

  • Missouri’s Leaders Work to Improve Lawsuit Climate as New Survey Shows State’s Ranking has Slipped

    Missouri’s lawsuit climate fell to 49th out of 50 in a new national survey released today by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR). The low ranking comes at the very time that Missouri’s governor and legislature have passed significant legal reforms designed to fix the problem that the survey highlights. The 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States surveyed senior business executives on their experiences with state lawsuit environments. The survey was in the field in the spring before the new reforms passed, and therefore reflect Missouri’s long-running problems with its lawsuit climate rather than the positive impact of its new laws. The emphasis on tort reform by Governor Greitens and other political leaders comes at a critical time. An all-time high 85 percent of survey participants said that a state’s lawsuit environment is likely to impact their company’s decisions about where to locate or expand. “Missouri’s lawsuit climate is in a state of transition, and Gov. Greitens and the state legislature deserve credit for rolling up their sleeves and working hard to turn things around,” said ILR President Lisa A. Rickard. “That’s a tall order given the poor legal environment that developed under past leaders, but the state is now...

  • Survey: Louisiana’s Lawsuit Climate Again Ranks Among Nation’s Worst

    For the first time, Louisiana’s lawsuit climate ranked 50th – the worst in the nation – according to a national survey released by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR). Louisiana had ranked 49th in the four previous surveys. 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States surveyed senior business executives on their experiences with state lawsuit environments. Watch the video above and click here to learn more.

  • New Lawsuit Climate Survey Shows Tort Reform Working in WV

    In its best showing ever, West Virginia’s lawsuit climate ranking improved by five places in 2017, from 50th to 45th in a new national survey released by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR). Before this year's survey, West Virginia had never ranked higher than 49th in the 10 previous surveys spanning 15 years. This improvement reflects a multi-year commitment to lawsuit reform that continued in 2017 under strong legislative leadership and support from Gov. Jim Justice. 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States surveyed senior business executives on their experiences with state lawsuits environments. Watch the video above and click here to learn more.

  • Survey: CA Lawsuit Climate Again Ranks Among Nation’s Worst

    For the third time since 2012, California’s lawsuit climate ranked number 47 out of 50 in a new national survey released by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR). California has been in the bottom 10 states since the survey began in 2002. 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States surveyed senior business executives on their experiences with state lawsuit environments. Watch the video above and click here to learn more.

  • Survey: IL Lawsuit Climate Again Ranks Among Nation’s Worst

    For the second time since 2015, Illinois’ lawsuit climate ranked number 48 out of 50 in a new national survey released today by the U.S. Chamber Institute for Legal Reform (ILR). Illinois has been in the bottom five states for the past decade. 2017 Lawsuit Climate Survey: Ranking the States surveyed senior business executives on their experiences with state lawsuit environments. Watch the video above and click here to learn more.

  • “Deceived” by jelly beans, woman files lawsuit against Jelly Belly

    Expecting to enjoy the delicious treats that former President Ronald Reagan loved so much, a woman has filed a lawsuit against the Jelly Belly company after she accidentally consumed the company’s Sport Beans product. Sport Beans are an exercise supplement produced by Jelly Belly, advertised as containing “electrolytes and vitamins.” But California resident Jessica Gomez says she was deceived about the sugar content of the product, with it containing more sugar than she was expecting. The response from Jelly Belly?  They called the lawsuit “nonsense." Gomez’s lawsuit claims that the product contains “evaporated cane juice,” which Gomez contends is nothing more than a substitute term for sugar used to deceive well-meaning health nuts who still want to eat their Jelly Beans. But, Jelly Belly contends that Gomez couldn’t have possibly read the “evaporated cane juice” on the ingredient list without also observing the nutritional information that discloses total sugar content.  Gomez’s suit alleges “negligent misrepresentation and violations of California’s Consumer Legal Remedies Act, False Advertising Law and Unfair Business Practices Law. She is seeking a trial by jury, damages, restitution, attorneys’ fees and injunctive relief.”

  • Most Ridiculous Lawsuits of 2017: Episode 3

    Most Ridiculous Lawsuits of 2017: Episode 3   Man Sues Date for Texting During Movie: “Bad first date” stories are very common — but what about stories about first dates that end in a lawsuit? Brendan Vezmar of Austin, TX, sued a woman who joined him on a first date to see Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 because she was texting during the film.  The suit sought the cost of the movie ticket … a whopping $17.31. Read the full story here. NBA Fan Sues because Warriors Player Injured Spurs Star: Some people take sports very seriously.  But perhaps no one takes it more seriously than San Antonio Spurs fan Juan Vasquez. Vasquez was so incensed that Golden State Warriors’ center Zaza Pachulia injured the Spurs’ Kawhi Leonard in game 1 of the teams’ Western Conference Finals matchup that he’s filed a lawsuit seeking $73,000, and for the court to put a stop to Pachulia’s defensive closeout techniques. Read the full story here. Lawsuit from Hell? Metal Band Members Sue 'Satanic' Lead Singer, Revealing Identities to the World: Many people who have been through the experience of a lawsuit might describe the experience as “hell.” But for one particular lawsuit, that description takes on...

  • ‘Time Clock’ Lawsuit Filed Against Starbucks

    Less than four minutes. That’s how long Starbucks estimates it takes for one of its employees to log out and lock up the store each day at closing. But former Starbucks shift supervisor Douglas Troester is the lead plaintiff in a class action case now before the California State Supreme Court. The lawsuit alleges the company should pay him for the time it takes to lock the doors after clocking out at closing. “This case is, at bottom, about the de minimis doctrine. That’s what the California Supreme Court has taken on and is going to decide,” said attorney Blaine Evanson, an expert on wage-and-hour lawsuits. “If an employee works a couple seconds, or a couple minutes, after his scheduled work time, we’re not going to require the employee to pay the employee for that amount of time, if it’s just practically impossible to record that time, or to track it over time.” If Troester’s suit is successful, Starbucks argues, it will overturn decades of precedent and open the floodgates of what it calls “absurd” lawsuits. It will also likely earn Troester’s plaintiffs’ attorney team millions of dollars . . . and, of course, also be one more cost to...

  • Lawsuit from Hell? Metal band members sue ‘satanic’ lead singer, revealing identities to the world

    Many people who have been through the experience of a lawsuit might describe the experience as “hell.” But for one particular lawsuit, that description takes on a whole new meaning. Several former members of the Swedish doom metal band Ghost have filed a lawsuit against the group’s lead singer, arguing that the “unabashed dishonest, greed, and darkness” of the group wasn’t just confined to their dark, heavy music. The group Ghost performs entirely in costume with the lead singer, known publicly as Papa Emeritus, in the garb of a satanic priest. The other band members – known only as “Nameless Ghouls,” dressed in costumes and mouthless, horned masks. Part of the bands mystique was that their true identities were completely hidden from the public. Completely hidden, that is, until a lawsuit filed by some of the Nameless Ghouls revealed their identities to the world. The litigious Ghouls contend that frontman Papa Emeritus, whose real name is Tobias Forge, “forced them to clean his musty costumes, clashed with them while on tour and financially shortchanged them.” Forge contends that the Ghouls were only musicians for hire, and thus were never a crucial part of the band. The Ghouls are seeking unpaid...